News Archive for 2013

Soldier Suicides Top Combat Deaths in 2012

Jan 15, 2013
As reported by NBC News, the number of soldiers who died from suicide (at least 177) was higher than the number of soldiers who died in combat (176) over the past year.

As reported by NBC News, the number of soldiers who died from suicide (at least 177) was higher than the number of soldiers who died in combat (176) over the past year. Three years ago, the military launched a suicide prevention program, and yet the Army’s suicide rate has continued to rise 9 percent since 2009 and 54 percent since 2007. Military families who recently endured the loss of a loved one blame the suicides on the persistent perception that soldiers will be viewed as “weak” for seeking mental health assistance or that their job will be in jeopardy. Reportedly, the suicide prevention funds were not spent until September last year when two U.S. legislators requested immediate implementation of those funds, and it is unclear if the delayed spending by the Pentagon played a role in the rise of suicides. The suicide prevention program teaches others to recognize the signs of suicidal behavior and provides guidance on how to help a person receive services. The program also provides a suicide prevention hotline.

Read more…

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Latest News

Soldier Suicides Top Combat Deaths in 2012

by Don Kenneally | Jan 15, 2013
As reported by NBC News, the number of soldiers who died from suicide (at least 177) was higher than the number of soldiers who died in combat (176) over the past year.

As reported by NBC News, the number of soldiers who died from suicide (at least 177) was higher than the number of soldiers who died in combat (176) over the past year. Three years ago, the military launched a suicide prevention program, and yet the Army’s suicide rate has continued to rise 9 percent since 2009 and 54 percent since 2007. Military families who recently endured the loss of a loved one blame the suicides on the persistent perception that soldiers will be viewed as “weak” for seeking mental health assistance or that their job will be in jeopardy. Reportedly, the suicide prevention funds were not spent until September last year when two U.S. legislators requested immediate implementation of those funds, and it is unclear if the delayed spending by the Pentagon played a role in the rise of suicides. The suicide prevention program teaches others to recognize the signs of suicidal behavior and provides guidance on how to help a person receive services. The program also provides a suicide prevention hotline.

Read more…