ACA Blog

Karen Bates
Aug 31, 2010

Old Is The New Young

Do people really change? Or is it more of a problem in adapting or transitioning from one developmental stage to another? I ask this question because of the recent behavior of the elderly that I have been noticing of late. Upon vacationing at my mother’s retirement home she had build 7 years ago in a well populated and popular adult community near Hilton Head, one of the discussions was the rise in sexually transmitted diseases. She is a retired public health nurse but she didn’t find this out by reading her professional publications that she still subscribes to. And NO she did not contract one. Her twin sister’s physician raised an eyebrow while making small talk when my mother and her sister (my aunt) were there for a follow-up visit for my aunt who was having some recent health problems after some exploratory procedure she had. My mother accompanies her to a lot of these as they are very close; well they are twins so that’s part of it. So back to the subject of my mother’s community now known as a “city” of ill-refute.

She laughed as did I but I am well aware of this growing trend as I was listening to the county nurse facilitating the communicable disease training I attended last year for my credentialing requirements for the agency I work. Apparently, the fountain of youth, so to speak, is all the erectile dysfunction medications on the market. So, I was pondering the question, if these men were womanizers in the past, I guess they are sort of picking up where they left off. So my word to the wise is, age may slow a person down somewhat, but not if there is a medication out there for it. Add this to the growing list of counseling issues that are bringing this population, many for the first time, into counseling, health care reform and the growing aging population from the baby boomers, behavioral health care counseling for the elderly is a growing occupation and niche. I am not an expert, not yet anyway, but I think it may behoove me to become knowledgeable of counselor competencies for the elderly. As an educated guess I think it would entail:
1. Theories of lifespan development
2. Addictions, particularly that of prescription drugs and alcohol
3. Relationship and marital counseling
4. Career counseling, namely, second-career and career transitioning, and
5. Community resources for referrals to financial planners, health care, and housing.
I have to admit, this population is one that I would not say that I have been interested but it is becoming more and more inviting if not intriguing. Older persons are refreshing. When you think about it, it sort of gives you a whole new outlook on growing old. Or should I say growing young at heart.



Karen Bates is a counselor, addiction specialist, and a doctoral student at Walden University.

Contact Name

Contact Title

Contact Email

Contact Phone

Related Info

Comment

  1. RadEditor - HTML WYSIWYG Editor. MS Word-like content editing experience thanks to a rich set of formatting tools, dropdowns, dialogs, system modules and built-in spell-check.
    RadEditor's components - toolbar, content area, modes and modules
       
    Toolbar's wrapper 
     
    Content area wrapper
    RadEditor's bottom area: Design, Html and Preview modes, Statistics module and resize handle.
    It contains RadEditor's Modes/views (HTML, Design and Preview), Statistics and Resizer
    Editor Mode buttonsStatistics moduleEditor resizer
      
    RadEditor's Modules - special tools used to provide extra information such as Tag Inspector, Real Time HTML Viewer, Tag Properties and other.
       

Join/Reinstate Your ACA and Division Memberships Today

  • Maximize your Professional Development
  • Learn more about your specialty—join a division
  • Stay ahead of the educational learning curve
  • Advocate for the counseling care of tomorrow
  • Expand your networking connections

Learn More

Join Now!
HPSO